Black Goat Campaign 03

Black Goat of the Woods, Part Three

Upon returning to Darkwood Abbey the heroes learned that the Archdeacon and Brother Jacob had made some progress on their research. The eldritch glyphs matched a trio of scrolls, known as the barrow scrolls. The scrolls belonged to the Abbey’s archived collection and were said to be unearthed from a nearby burial mound. The barrows belonged to the barbaric culture that preceded the founding of the Kingdom.

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By: zarono on Etsy

However, the scrolls were written in an unknown language and the Abbey’s librarians could not translate them. There was a wizard (Anton Valchrist) who visited the Abbey a few years prior and had studied the barrow scrolls. It is believed that he was able to translate them, but he returned to Wyvernmoor without sharing his translation with the Abbey’s officials.

The Archdeacon also told them of a dark tale that some elders tell their grandchildren. About three brothers and three dark pools in the woods. The brothers searched for the pools to ask for blessings. The blessings granted were mixed in nature and the tale had moral lessons attached to it. There was no evidence that would lead anyone to believe these tales were true. So, it was simply passed off as a bit of folklore that had been passed down over generations. The  clerics of the Abbey dismissed them as boogeyman folklore.

One of the heroes a fey-touched elf named Lyonesse, put more faith into the folklore and went so far as to wonder about the Abbey’s location. “Holy sites are commonly built on places of mystical power. Could one of the pools be here, in or below the Abbey?” The Archdeacon avoided this line of questioning, but did admit that the Abbey had a set of vaults beneath it guarding something. He then asked the heroes to pursue the translations of the barrow scrolls. The heroes obliged him and set out for Wyvernmoor, to find the wizard Anton Valchrist.

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